Microsoft and Nokia complete mobile phone unit deal

yyMicrosoft has completed its purchase of Nokia’s mobile phone business for 5.44bn euros ($7.5bn; £4.5bn).

The deal between the two firms should have been completed earlier this year but it was delayed by a hold-up in regulatory approvals.

The sale will see the end of production of mobile phones by Nokia.

“Today we welcome the Nokia devices and services business to our family,” said Microsoft chief executive Satya Nadella.

“The mobile capabilities and assets they bring will advance our transformation.”

The Finnish company will now focus on networks, mapping services and technology development and licences.

Two Nokia plants will remain outside the deal – a manufacturing unit in Chennai, India, subject to an asset freeze by Indian tax authorities, and the Masan plant in South Korea, which it plans to shut down.

Former Nokia chief executive Stephen Elop has become executive vice president of the Microsoft devices group, in charge of Lumia smartphones and tablets, Nokia mobile phones, Xbox hardware, Microsoft Surface, and Perceptive Pixel (PPI) products

Nokia Microsoft mobile deal gets shareholder go ahead

Shareholders of the phonemaker Nokia have agreed to sell their mobile phone business to

Handphone as a Modern Lifestyle

samsung s4Handphone has become the new technology of today’s lifestyle. As a proof, children as young as 7 years old are already using handphones. Thinking back at a decade ago, handphones are still bulky and expensive and they are only used by some people such as businessman and the rich. Today, handphones are largely used by most of us. It has been the primary needs of our daily life. In this rapidly changing world, technology is growing and handphones are getting affordably cheap.

There are a lot of important usages we can get from handphone. Let’s take a look at some of its positive effects. As its primary usage, of course, it is use as a way of communication. We can communicate anywhere we want as long as it has signal. For example, in Indonesia there are a lot of people working in other countries; handphones enable them to communicate with their family, especially for people living in the countryside. Short Message System which is also known as SMS is very popular among the youngsters. This is because SMS is much cheaper than making

Samsung Galaxy S6 Review: The iPhone 6 Has Met Its Match

samIn this unpredictable world, it’s the constants in life that I can count on.

The sun rises in the East, Starbucks lattes always taste the same, and Apple’s iPhones are always better than Samsung’s Galaxy phones.

Since the dawn of the smartphone wars, there have been basic truths about Samsungs: They’re made of flimsy plastic, their cameras can’t keep up with the iPhone’s, and their modified Android software is ugly and intolerably cluttered.

With the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge, which arrive at U.S. carriers on April 10, none of that is true anymore. I am not afraid to say it: I love Samsung’s new phones, maybe even more than my own iPhone 6. Like a child who just found out that Santa isn’t real, I have spent the past week questioning everything I know.

OK, maybe that’s a bit dramatic for smartphones, but I’m serious about how drastic the change is. Samsung has taken direct aim at Apple’s smartphone, this time even seeming to copy some of the iPhone’s design and features.

No, neither of the new Galaxys brings any original ideas to the

HP Puts the Future of Computing On Hold

Plans by Hewlett-Packard for computers based on an exotic new electronic device called the memristor are scaled back.

In April I wrote about an ambitious project by Hewlett-Packard to use an electronic device for storing data called the memristor to reinvent the basic design of computers (see “Machine Dreams”). This week HP chief technology officer Martin Fink, who started and leads the project, announced a rethink of the project amidst uncertainty over the memristor’s future.

Fink and other HP executives had previously estimated that they would have the core technologies needed for the computer they dubbed “the Machine” in testing sometime in 2016. They used the timeline at the bottom of this post to sketch out where the project was headed.

But the New York Times reported yesterday that the project has been “repositioned” to focus on delivering the Machine using less exotic memory technologies–the DRAM found in most computers today and a technology just entering production called phase change memory, which stores data by melting a special material and controlling how it cools.

With memristors out of the picture, there’s reason to doubt just how revolutionary HP’s project can be.

The main feature of the Machine’s design was to be a large collection of

Microsoft targets mobile phone unit as 7,800 more jobs go

Microsoft is shedding another 7,800 jobs as it reorganises its Nokia mobile phone unit.

The move represents a massive shift in strategy for Microsoft since it purchased Nokia’s mobile phone business for €5.44bn ($7.5bn; £4.5bn) last year.

Microsoft axed 18,000 jobs from the unit last July – the deepest cuts in the company’s history.

The technology giant will also write down the value of the Nokia deal by $7.6bn.

Microsoft currently has about 118,000 employees worldwide. A statement from the government in Finland, were Nokia is based, said the job losses would include some 2,300 posts in the country.

The statement said the government was “disappointed with Microsoft’s decision” and called a special ministerial meeting to consider assistance for those affected. “Loss of so many jobs is very sad for the whole society and for individuals affected,” it said.

Microsoft said in a statement that it would “restructure the company’s phone hardware business to better focus and align resources”.

Although still strong in the software market for personal computers, the company is faces strong competition in the fight to establish its mobile handset operation. This market is dominated by devices

Samsung Begins Smartphone Assembly in Indonesia

Samsung Electronics Co. has begun assembling smartphones at a factory outside Jakarta to meet demand in fast-growing Indonesia, according to a person familiar with the matter.

The move is the latest sign that the South Korean technology giant is shifting some of its operations to low-cost, fast-growing emerging markets where it is looking to build its presence and cut costs.

The Indonesian unit of the South Korean technology giant aims to assemble 1.5 million handsets each month at a plant in Cikarang, an industrial town east of Jakarta, according to this person, who added that Samsung would manufacture its latest 4G-enabled smartphone at the plant and sell it to consumers starting this month. Samsung currently assembles its phones in South Korea, China and Vietnam and last year sold more than 300 million smartphones globally, according to research firm IDC.

The shift in production is partly a response to new Indonesian regulations aimed at keeping the production of mobile phones in the country, this person said, who added that Samsung started making the phones in January.

A spokesman for Samsung declined to comment, but confirmed that the company has a manufacturing facility outside Jakarta that

5 Best Travel Headphones

I travel a lot. I also review headphones. Figuring out what headphones are the best for travel seems like a logical idea. More than just a “these seem cool” list, these are all headphones I’ve personally reviewed or at least heard, plus I’ve included links to other reviewers that like them too.

So, what are the 5 Best Travel Headphones?

Check out the 2015 version of this article: Best Travel Headphones 2015!

Before we get going, if you’re curious about the value of high-end headphones, or have questions about headphones in general, first check out Are Expensive Headphones Worth It?, What Are The Best Headphones?, Are Noise Cancelling Headphones Worth It?, Glossary of Headphone Terms, Best Headphone Test Tracks, Noise Cancelling Vs. Noise Isolating Headphones, and 10 Headphones Better Than Beats.

5) Bowers & Wilkins C5 Series 2

What are they: Small, lightweight in-ear headphones with a unique and clever way of securing to your head.

Why they’re good: These are the most comfortable in-ear headphones I’ve ever tried, and they’re also some of the best sounding. Rich, full bass that’s not boomy. Clear, open treble that’s not harsh. I loved the originals. These new models I’ve only had a chance to listen to briefly, but they sounded good.

Who else likes them: Sound&Vision liked them.

New York Considers Mandating Back Doors Into Phones

With a bill reintroduced last week, a New York Assemblyman wants to make it easy for the government to get inside smartphones. It’s a proposal that would mandate smartphone manufacturers be able to unlock the phones they make. The bill comes from Assemblyman Matthew Titone, of Staten Island’s North Shore, and was first introduced last summer. It’s sat in the Consumer Affairs and Protection committee since, so it’s still a long way from becoming law. A cryptographic back door would be bad for cryptography, privacy, and consumers.

The “back door” metaphor isn’t too far from the truth, so let’s flesh it out for a minute. In a memo sent out in support of the bill this week, the bill’s author does that for us. He describes a phone that cannot be unlocked except by the owner like this:

It is as if the police get a search warrant for a safe deposit box at a bank because they have reason to believe that the safe deposit box has evidence of a crime – but they cannot open the box because the bank has thrown away its own key. Indeed, this situation is even worse because whereas

Apple Ready To Gamble On New iPhone Technology

Not content with the 3D touch interface that was added to the iPhone 6S and iPhone 6S Plus screens, Apple looks set to move to a new screen technology in 2017′s iPhone.

There has been a consistent build up of leaks, rumors, and suggestions from the supply chain that a switch away from the LCD technology currently used by Apple for its iPhone screens is on the cards. Moving to OLED screens would allow for more power efficient displays that have a wider viewing angle, better color reproduction, and a more vibrant display. Apple has been reluctant in the past to make this switch because of worries around the lifespan of OLED screens.

Apple must be confident that these issues are now answered (presumably with technology along the lines of that detailed in its patents using photodiodes and varying the anode pitch in OLED screens). Nikkei Asian Review (via Patently Apple) is reporting that Apple has notified its supply chain of the upcoming switch to OLED for iPhones released in the 2017/2018 smartphone season.

This would point to the adoption of OLED screens for the presumptively tilted iPhone 7S. Going with the 7S as the debut handset makes a certain

Youngsters ‘addicted to mobile phones’

The addiction of children to their mobile phones could threaten the very fabric of society, a study suggests.

Many teenagers are fanatical about being always available and are extremely uneasy if unable to contact their friends countless times each day.

If the trend continues, young people will soon be incapable of forming and maintaining relationships without the help of a mobile, the study by a leading sociologist concludes.

One British child in four between the ages of five and 16 now has a mobile phone.

As well as making calls, youngsters are using their handsets to send millions of text messages to friends each day.

The study’s author, Dr Hisao Ishii, said: ‘Teenagers can be seen taking advantage of every spare minute to touch base with their friends.

‘It is not the content of the communication but the act of staying in touch that matters.’

And he warned: ‘Genuine conversation will be driven out by superficial communication, in which the act of contacting one another is all that matters, leading to a deterioration in the quality of relationships. Indeed, the very fabric of society may be threatened.’

Although Dr Ishii’s

HP Has Enough Workers to Fill a City—And It Needs Them All

Silicon Valley technology giant HP will lay off as many as 30,000 more people as part of its split into two separate companies, the company told analysts this week. This comes on top of the 55,000 jobs HP has been in the process of shedding in recent years. Even so, HP is still as large as a mid-sized US city. As of May, according to Forbes, the company numbered 302,000. But what in the world do all those people do?

In an era in which WhatsApp can serve 900 million users with just 50 engineers, the massive enterprise tech company feels like an anachronism. In HP’s case, its huge headcount doesn’t even include outsourced labor, such as call center operators or the assembly line workers who actually build all those printers and laptops. But it turns out that the business of selling technology to businesses has long required something old-fashioned: lots and lots of people (at least for now).

The typical consumer probably thinks of HP as a printer and PC company, but it’s much more than that. It’s also a massive information technology consulting operation with a large portfolio of business software and cloud computing offerings. HP’s forthcoming reorganization will create two businesses, one called called HP

Exploding Samsung Galaxy phone leaves teenager with third degree burns and smelling like a ‘burnt pig’

A Swiss teenager suffered second and third degree burns when her smartphone apparently exploded in her pocket.

Fanny Schlatter, 18, was injured when the Samsung Galaxy S3 allegedly blew up in her trouser pocket.

She claims to have been left with no feeling in her right thigh and said she will be launching a criminal complaint against Samsung

French language paper Le Matin reported that Ms Schlatter was working as an painting apprentice when she heard a large bang.

She told the paper: ‘All of a sudden I heard the sound of an explosion – like a firecracker.

‘Then I noticed a strange chemical smell and my work trousers began to catch fire.’

By the time Ms Schlatter’s boss, Stephane Kubler, had come to her assistance, the flames had reached her shoulders.

She was rushed into the nearest bathroom where colleagues doused the flames before driving her to hospital.

Ms Schlatter explained: ‘Luckily my hair was tied up and my sweater didn’t have time to catch fire.’

However, she added that her burns were severe enough to make her smell like a ‘burnt pig’.

The burns have left Ms